Date Rape Drug – GHB

ROHYPNOL  | KETAMINE | ECSTASY | OVERVIEW

What is GHB? (Gamma- Hydroxybutyrate)

GHB was originally developed as an anesthetic, but withdrawn due to unwanted side effects. It has been used for the treatment of narcolepsy, alcohol withdrawal symptoms, and more recently as a growth hormone stimulant and fat burning drug used by body builders. In March of 2000, GHB was made legal to treat  patients with narcolepsy. Despite its legalization, the distribution of GHB is  tightly regulated for these patients.

GHB can be produced in the form of a white powder, but is more commonly encountered as an odorless, clear liquid. GHB has a salty taste which is masked when mixed with a drink. GHB will remain in a person’s blood for approximately 4 hours and will remain detectable in the urine for up to 12 hours.

Common Street Names
Bedtime Scoop, Cherry Meth, Easy Lay, Energy Drink, G, Gamma 10, Georgia Home Boy, G-Juice, Gook, Goop, Great Hormones, Grievous Bodily Harm (GBH), Liquid E, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid X, PM, Salt Water, Soap, Somatomax, Vita-G

Use and Effects
GHB is primarily used by body builders with the false assumption that it will burn fat and increase hormone growth. It is promoted as a drug that will increase one’s sexual awareness and lead to more sexual activity. Low doses result in a general feeling if euphoria (similar to being moderately under the effect of alcohol) which includes: decreased inhibitions, increased sociability, followed by drowsiness then sleep. Higher doses result in an immediate onset of intoxication leading to a deep unresponsive sleep, shallow breathing, decreased blood pressure and invariably amnesia. In conjunction with alcohol or any depressant drug, it may be fatal. This drug can be easily disguised in any beverage. Within a few minutes of drinking the liquid, the victim will appear intoxicated and become helpless. Because GHB is quickly absorbed into the human body, evidence will be lost if the victim’s blood or urine is not preserved soon after the attack.

References:

  1. “21  USC, Section 801.” Office of Diversion Control . N.p., n.d. Web. 26  June 2013. <http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/21cfr/21usc/801.htm>.
  2. “Date  Rape Drugs.” womenshealth.gov. Ed. Susan Weiss. N.p., n.d. Web. 26  June 2013. <http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/date-rape-drugs.html>.
  3. “Drug  Guide .” Ketamine . Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), n.d.  Web. 26 June 2013. <http://www.drugfree.org/drug-guide/ketamine>.
  4. “Ecstasy:  As A Date Rape Drug .” Healthy Place . Ed. Harry Croft.  Healthyplace.com, 28 Dec. 2008. Web. 26 June 2013.  <http://www.healthyplace.com/sex/date-rape/ecstasy-as-a-date-rape-drug/>.
  5. “MDMA  (Ecstasy or Molly).” NDA For Teens. NDA, n.d. Web. 26 June 2013.  <http://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/mdma-ecstasy-or-molly>.